Photos and Events

The Arts and Craftsmen Guild is getting in on the painted rock craze! We hope if you find one of our Triangle Rose painted rocks (read about why we use the Rose below) that you'll visit Sweet Buffalo Rocks on Facebook and let everyone know! Please also email us at artsandcraftsmenguild@gmail.com so we can add you on Facebook and our website! We'd love a picture to share! If you're rehiding the rocks, let Sweet Buffalo Rocks know where they can be found, so that the whole community can join in the fun!

About the Triangle Rose:

The Arts & Crafts movement was a social and artistic movement of the 19th century, in reaction to the Industrial Revolution. An emphasis was placed on the return to handwork, skilled craftsmanship, and attention to design in both utilitarian and decorative objects. In the early days of the movement in Great Britain, MacIntosh designed the Round Rose symbol. In America, Dard Hunter is credited to have designed the Square Rose which was utilized heavily on the Roycroft Campus. The Arts and Craftsmen Guild has designed and adopted the Triangle Rose as their trademark, continuing and honoring the Arts & Crafts Movement. 

Roycroft Art Show Applications Available

 

Applications for all three Roycroft Campus Art Shows are now available online. The campus looks to continue growing these shows and giving more opportunities for artists to show their work. NEW this year will be a student section at our Summer and Fall shows. Those currently enrolled in High School or College can apply for a table in this special section of these shows. More information can be found at 
 www.roycroftcampuscorporation.com 

Captivating video by our very own Vicki Schneider. Look how she makes glass work seem so easy! This video will pull you in, it's truly hypnotic!

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Here is a quick video, submitted by Ray Deibel, to give folks a sense of how wood bowls are turned on a lathe.  This is finish turning - the chips are smaller because the wood has been seasoned. I'm using a scraper versus a bowl gouge. A scraper removes less material and lets me "sneak up" on my final form. It also gives me a little better surface finish, which shortens the sanding process significantly.